Interesting facts carbon dating

The Shroud of Turin is much older than suggested by radiocarbon dating carried out in the 1980s, according to a new study in a peer-reviewed journal.

A research paper published in Thermochimica Acta suggests the shroud is between 1,300 and 3,000 years old.

Raymond Rogers says his research and chemical tests show the material used in the 1988 radiocarbon analysis was cut from a medieval patch woven into the shroud to repair fire damage.

It was this material that was responsible for an invalid date being assigned to the original shroud cloth, he argues.

The 4m-long linen sheet was damaged in several fires since its existence was first recorded in France in 1357, including a church blaze in 1532.

It forms more compounds than any other element and forms the basis to all plant and animal life.

Carbon is the fourth most abundant element in the universe by mass and the second most abundant element in the human body.

Before we get into the details of how radiometric dating methods are used, we need to review some preliminary concepts from chemistry.

Recall that atoms are the basic building blocks of matter.